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Changing Shapes

May 30, 2012

Fashion | by Danny & Josh


A large part of the fashion industry’s role is to make the first progressions towards fashion evolution. Whilst luxury labels need to make commercial decisions in order to remain financially afloat, they are also the dictators of fashion direction, and thus need to also think creatively. It is from their collections high street brands find their fashion compass, and thus trends are born, worn, and eventually superseded.

Reacting to a number of social, financial, and political factors, designers create and promote ever-changing colours, shapes, and styles, all whilst simultaneously expressing their creative talent.

Each season gradual changes appear on the catwalks, for example, winter 2011/’12 was all about emerald tones, and now we’re suddenly in a sea of sugary pastels. These changes can be gradual, or perhaps a trend remains prevalent for a few years- such as skinny-leg jeans, but eventually a dramatic change must come, largely in order to boost sales, but of course to keep fashion in momentum. When a new trend comes on the scene it can be a moment of excitement and relief such as high-waisted trousers; alternatively it can result in disappointment such as Balmain’s Spring 2008 pointed shouldered military jackets.

How does this change in shape translate? Personally any form of attire which upholds the values of comfort is a tick in my fashion book; and although such shapes are not particularly flattering to the female form, fashions before us prove that in the blink of an eye the definition of “flattering” can revolutionize simply with the change of season.Setting aside personal taste, the constant flux that is the fashion industry ultimately sets a platform for lucrative business; and with the Autumn/Winter shows in Paris this past March, it seems dramatic shape evolution is occurring. Designers such as Hermes(above) , LV, Celine (below), & Chanel had their girls dressed in a whole new genre of geometric outerwear cuts. Opting for oversized, mannish styles, these coats completely lacked structural elements such as shoulder pads, darts, pleats, and vents. In bold blocked colours, comfortable, androgynous shapes showered the shows, promoting an evolved sense of the modern power woman.

How does this change in shape translate? Personally any form of attire which upholds the values of comfort is a tick in my fashion book; and although such shapes are not particularly flattering to the female form, fashions before us prove that in the blink of an eye the definition of “flattering” can revolutionize simply with the change of season.

Stephanie Kukulka