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Exhibitions to Explore This Month

July 15, 2014

ArtsGroup ExhibitionMixed MediaPaintingSculpture | by Maxine Kirsty Sapsford


L2R: © Adrian Ghenie, Courtesy The Pace Gallery. CLAD, 2013, 59 7/16 x 75 3/16 in., © Gilbert & George, Courtesy White Cube. Image courtesy of Stour Space Gallery. Richard Tuttle, Walking on Air, C3, (2009), Cotton with Rit dyes, grommets, thread, 2x panels, overall installed: 1ft 11 inches x 10ft 4.75 in., Photograph by Kerry Ryan McFate, courtesy Pace Gallery, Image © Richard Tuttle, courtesy Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London and Pace Gallery, NY.
Left to Right, Top to Bottom:  Adrian Ghenie, Selfportrait as Charles Darwin, 2014, Oil on canvas, 60 x 47 cm, © Adrian Ghenie, Courtesy The Pace Gallery. CLAD, 2013, 59 7/16 x 75 3/16 in. (151 x 191 cm), © Gilbert & George, Courtesy White Cube. TACO-TRICYCLE-TIMBUKTU exhibition, courtesy of Stour Space Gallery. Richard Tuttle, Walking on Air, C3, (2009), Cotton with Rit dyes, grommets, thread, 2x panels, overall installed: 1ft 11 inches x 10ft 4.75 inches/58.4 x 316.8 cm, Photograph by Kerry Ryan McFate, courtesy Pace Gallery, Image © Richard Tuttle, courtesy Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London and Pace Gallery, New York.

 

Charles Dawin as a young man, 2014, Oil on canvas, 50 x 33 cm, © Adrian Ghenie, Courtesy The Pace Gallery.
Charles Dawin as a young man, 2014, Oil on canvas, 50 x 33 cm, © Adrian Ghenie, Courtesy The Pace Gallery.

COMING TO AN END –

Adrian Ghenie, Golems, Finishes on the 25th

 Adrian Ghenie’s show Golems finishes on the 25th this month. His haunting paint-on-linen works are a play on the traditional meaning of the Jewish word ‘Golem’ which describes a small clay figure, brought to life by magic, capable of evil deeds and without a fixed form. Ghenie’s handling of oils is reminiscent of these qualities of magic and an unstable reality; facial features are surreal suggestions resting uneasily on the heads of undefined shadowy spectres. The eerie, slightly uneasy feel of Ghenie’s work continues unbroken from these painted works to The Darwin Room, an installation of meticulously sourced eighteenth and nineteenth century panelling, floor boards and furniture, juxtaposed with contemporary items.

 

Romanian artist Adrian Ghenie’s Golems features nine oil on linen paintings and a large site-specific installation, all of which have been occupying the artist’s practice since 2013. His show at Pace London continues until the 25th July. For more information go to – pacegallery.com

 

 

SWEET AIR SWEET AIR, 2013, 89 x 124 13/16 in. (226 x 317 cm), © Gilbert & George, Courtesy White Cube
SWEET AIR SWEET AIR, 2013, 89 x 124 13/16 in. (226 x 317 cm), © Gilbert & George, Courtesy White Cube

GIANTS OF ART – 

Gilbert & George, SCAPEGOATING PICTURES for LONDON, Opens on the 18th

Gilbert & George have a new exhibition opening on Friday 18th at the White Cube Bermondsey gallery which will hold a generous offering of over sixty new works by the partners in crime.

Taking on an even darker tone than usual, Gilbert & George hone in on the scandalous side of urban culture with images such as Sweet Air Sweet Air where the artists have decorated the image with nitrous oxide canisters. Collected on their morning walks, these containers litter the alleys near the artists home, abandoned the night before, their precious liquids inhaled and spent. 

Like cute little baby bombs, these shells are a symbolic echoing of the sinister underbelly of the city, never intended for the cold light of day. Gilbert & George seem to take great delight in thrusting them into the spotlight along with a host of other deviant subject matter. Playing on the container’s visual reference to war and conflict, they continue this theme with their masked appearance in many of their images; CLAD for instance, shows the artists wearing armoured suits and helmets. This promises to be an intense, gritty and morbidly delightful exhibition not to be missed.

Opening Friday the 18th July at the White Cube Bermondsey, SCAPEGOATING PICTURES for LONDON will run until the 28th of September. For more information go to – whitecube.com

 

 

TACO-TRICYCLE-TIMBUKTU
HIN, TACO-TRICYCLE-TIMBUKTU exhibition, courtesy of Stour Space Gallery

FINGER ON THE PULSE –

TACO-TRICYCLE-TIMBUKTU, Group Exhibition, runs until August 4th

Stour Space Gallery in Hackney Wick is currently home to a group show featuring the work of Bob Motown, HIN and John Atherton. TACO-TRICYCLE-TIMBUKTU is a delicious cocktail of random ingredients that shouldn’t go together but do and delightfully well. This nonsensical grouping of random subject matter such as Mary as Wonderwoman, Ronal McDonld meets Gandi and a cat with a taco for a body are thrown together in a light hearted manner (as a good cocktail should be) designed to entertain rather than to shock. This playful show has a strong graphic design flavour with a sprinkling of modern mediums and a dash of morbid curiosity, topped off with all the fluorescence of a neon curly straw. When consumed prepare to be made to both giggle and think.

TACO-TRICYCLE-TIMBUKTU runs until August 4th at Stour Space, Hackney Wick. For more information go to – stourspace.co.uk

 

 

Richard Tuttle, In 23, (1998), Acrylic, canvas, wood, 13-1/4 x 12-1/2 x 2 inches/33.7 x 31.8 x 5.1 cm, Photograph by Joerg Lohse, courtesy Pace Gallery Image © Richard Tuttle, courtesy Stuart, Shave/Modern Art, London and Pace Gallery, New York
Richard Tuttle, In 23, (1998), Acrylic, canvas, wood, 13-1/4 x 12-1/2 x 2 inches/33.7 x 31.8 x 5.1 cm, Photograph by Joerg Lohse, courtesy Pace Gallery
Image © Richard Tuttle, courtesy Stuart, Shave/Modern Art, London and Pace Gallery, New York

ONE TO WAIT FOR –

Richard Tuttle, White Chapel/Tate Modern opens 14th October

Pencil the 14th October into your diary, a major collaboration between two of London’s most prestigious galleries is coming. They bring together the largest body of works by renowned American sculptor and poet Richard Tuttle ever assembled in the UK. This collaboration encompasses a large scale commission by the artist in the iconic Turbine Hall (Tate Modern) in tandem with the displaying of a huge body of Tuttle’s work spanning five decades of his career (Whitechapel Gallery) and the publication of a new book by the artist; I Don’t Know, Or The Weave of Textile Language (Tate Publishing in association with the Whitechapel Gallery). 

Tuttle’s unusual combining of sculpture, painting, poetry and drawing have brought him acclaim since the mid 60s when he was one of the first artists to take the canvas off it’s stretcher and apply it directly to the wall. Continuing his theme of elevating such humble materials as paper, rope and plywood, the colossal twelve plus meter high sculpture in the Turbine hall centres around the medium of textile.

Tuttle himself will be helping to curate the Whitechapel Gallery, positioning works in relation to each other and in sympathy with the architecture. This exhibition, also occupied heavily by textile pieces, centres around his use of fibre, thread and textile and will occupy both ground and first floor galleries. It will feature works ranging in scale from the intricate series of Section, Extension wall pieces, to the 3-metre long floor-based sculpture Systems VI.

White Chapel exhibition runs 14 October to 14 December 2014, for more information go to – whitechapelgallery.org

Turbine Hall Commission runs 14 October 2014 to 6 April 2015, for more information go to – tate.org.uk

 

Words Maxine Kirsty Sapsford, Arts Editor