Film
Multiple Maniacs review: a revolutionary and revolting re-release

Multiple Maniacs review: a revolutionary and revolting re-release

John Waters’ celebrated back catalogue of camp, cult classics hold an often referenced and revered place in many a film buff’s personal pop culture lexicon, yet only die-hard fans may’ve heard of Multiple Maniacs. Many audiences are familiar with his slightly more mainstream musical comedy movies (the caveat being that Waters is never wholly mainstream)...
Lovetrue review: Drifting from agony to ecstasy and back again

Lovetrue review: Drifting from agony to ecstasy and back again

Alma Har’el became something of a festival darling with her debut feature, Bombay Beach, in 2011. In addition to scoring her the Best Documentary Award at that year’s Tribeca Film Festival, it also endeared her to the increasingly art-savvy Shia LaBeouf, who went on to bankroll her latest offering – LoveTrue. Where Bombay Beach was...
Prevenge review: Alice Lowe's Silence of the Prams

Prevenge review: Alice Lowe’s Silence of the Prams

With a portmanteau title that’s a composite of ‘pregnancy’ and ‘revenge’, Prevenge’s horror comedy wheelhouse lands somewhere between American Psycho and Rosemary’s Baby. Writer/director Alice Lowe, heavily pregnant herself at the time of filming, plays an expectant mother driven to murder at her unborn child’s demonic insistence. The evil offspring exercises its will by peevishly...
Candid talks to Hacksaw Ridge's Vince Vaughn

Candid talks to Hacksaw Ridge’s Vince Vaughn

Candid Magazine’s Fraser Kay says, ‘Hacksaw Ridge flourishes as a slice of war cinema of the highest quality.’ Directed by Mel Gibson and starring Andrew Garfield, Richard Pyros and Vince Vaughn, the film has been extolled as a war epic for the modern age. Candid’s Chicago-based associate, Jeff Conway met with Vaughn, who plays Sergeant Howell, for...
Toni Erdmann review: a performance art dad joke for the ages

Toni Erdmann review: a performance art dad joke for the ages

Writer / director Maren Ade’s new film is a perversely off-kilter tale of an emotionally distant father and daughter. After the death of his beloved pet dog, bumbling practical joker Winfried (Peter Simonischek) pays a visit to his career driven daughter Ines (Sandra Huller). Ines is working as a corporate strategist in Bucharest on a...
Hacksaw Ridge review - brutal, engrossing and uplifting

Hacksaw Ridge review – brutal, engrossing and uplifting

It has been over ten years since his last directorial feature, but his new offering Hacksaw Ridge could mark Mel Gibson’s triumphant return to Hollywood. The film is a brutal, engrossing and uplifting war epic that pushes both its characters and its audience to their emotional limits. The true story presented on screen is of...
Cameraperson review: humour, pain and pathos

Cameraperson review: humour, pain and pathos

“These are the images that have marked me and leave me wondering still” – Kirstin Johnson   Cameraperson’s stream of experience filmmaking builds a poetry somewhere almost outside narrative, mixing the rare transcendent quality of Godfrey Reggio’s Koyaanisqatsi, the enticing personal revelations of Jonathan Caouette’s Tarnation, the kinetic joy of Vertov’s Man With A Movie...
An Interview with Eoin Macken

An Interview with Eoin Macken

A combination of restlessness and unbridled talent is how we would describe Eoin Macken. His hunger for knowledge across the inner-workings of everything (from the human brain to the intricacies of film-making) means he’s constantly on the go. You’ll have seen Eoin Macken in plenty of fashion campaigns – at the start of his career...
East Side Sushi review: a good meal overcooked

East Side Sushi review: a good meal overcooked

As this reviewer found out, East Side Sushi is not a film to be watched when hungry, unless you want those stomach rumbles to become increasingly severe. Anthony Lucero’s feature length directorial debut is a celebration of food from all corners of the globe, but more than that, it’s also a celebration of the people...
Captain Fantastic Blu-ray review: Easy watching drama

Captain Fantastic Blu-ray review: Easy watching drama

There is something in both family dramas and road-trip comedies that everyone can relate to and, happy or sad, they channel the ultimate feel-good vibe. Captain Fantastic, Matt Ross’s dramedy about a family living off-grid is another one of these, a character study that explores the pros and cons of seeking an alternative to capitalism....
Candid Interviews La La Land Writer & Director

Candid Interviews La La Land Writer & Director

Hailed as ‘Spectacular in style and substance,’ by Samuel Sims on Candid Magazine, modern musical La La Land, starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, has been nominated for seven Golden Globes and is hot-tipped as an Oscar contender. Candid’s Chicago-based associate, Jeff Conway sat down with writer and director, Damien Chazelle and actress Rosemarie DeWitt, who...
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them review: the magic remains

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them review: the magic remains

Nearly five years since the last Harry Potter movie came out, JK Rowling returns with Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, a prequel to the wizarding series that captured so many imaginations. Set in the 1920s, the only returning influence to the franchise is director David Yates, bringing the same flare and style that drove the last four...
James Schamus interview: 'I might as well risk flopping'

James Schamus interview: ‘I might as well risk flopping’

The first thing James Schamus says when we sit down to chat is that he likes my shoes. They are a pair of slightly scuffed brown Dr. Martens – and he is wearing exactly the same ones. Whether I dress like a 57-year-old film director or he dresses like a young woman is debatable, but...
Documentary: The Safe House: A Decline of Ideas

Documentary: The Safe House: A Decline of Ideas

Will the great institutions that house our vast collections of books and knowledge one day be obsolete? Have you visited or even thought about your local library lately? A new documentary called The Safe House: A Decline of Ideas, by Davina Catt – who was on the jury for last year’s London European Film Festival...
Anne Fontaine interview: 'Hearing it is stronger than seeing it'

Anne Fontaine interview: ‘Hearing it is stronger than seeing it’

With the majority of director Anne Fontaine’s films having a contemporary setting, her latest offering, The Innocents, seems somewhat removed from her previous work. Despite the new period and location, however, her trademark intuitive depiction of women remains. Based on real events, the film tells the story of a group of Polish nuns who find...
The Innocents review: a haunting drama

The Innocents review: a haunting drama

At first glance, The Innocents seems to mark a departure from Anne Fontaine’s previous films. Set in Poland at the end of the Second World War and based on notes written by French Red Cross Doctor Madeleine Pauliac, you won’t find tumultuous love triangles or blissful beach life. And yet the director’s signature themes remain:...
Arrival review: unbeatably imaginative sci-fi

Arrival review: unbeatably imaginative sci-fi

Anyone watching director Denis Villeneuve’s Arrival would openly admit that this isn’t your ordinary alien invasion movie. Arrival is impressive in being just as harrowing as any other extra-terrestrial movie, but is so incredibly unlike what’s gone before it, which is what makes it exceptional. It’s a deeply thought-out narrative that anyone with a love...
Nocturnal Animals review: cold and terrifying

Nocturnal Animals review: cold and terrifying

If Tom Ford’s first feature, A Single Man, was clearly the work of a fashion designer, his new offering, Nocturnal Animals, displays his real calibre as a director. Elements of his previous work remain, but they are subtler and less superfluous. Here we have a film based on Austin Wright’s 1993 novel Tony and Susan,...
The Light Between Oceans review: compelling and beautiful

The Light Between Oceans review: compelling and beautiful

Although apparently having met for the first time on the dance floor of some Toronto Film Festival after party, it’s on the set of The Light Between Oceans that co-stars and now Hollywood power couple Michael Fassbender and Alicia Vikander became an item – and frankly, who could blame them? When you’re “stuck” for months in...
Burn Burn Burn review: tender comedy

Burn Burn Burn review: tender comedy

Chanya Button’s directorial debut Burn Burn Burn is a dramatic comedy/road trip across the UK, covering death, friendship, and love. It’s a sweet film that could have been better executed; like a birthday card made from macaroni, it’s not perfect but it’s great for what it is. Burn Burn Burn stars Laura Carmichael as Seph...
After Love review: claustrophobic drama

After Love review: claustrophobic drama

It’s probably a little lazy of me to describe Joachim Lafosse’s After Love (L’Économie du Couple) as ‘play-like’. Not only is it lazy, but it is also an entirely unoriginal interpretation; it only takes a brief survey of the available reviews online to find the comparison numerous times already. It is, however, the easiest point...
Doctor Strange review: a mind-bending Marvel

Doctor Strange review: a mind-bending Marvel

After a cityscape bending opening fight sequence teasing us with what’s to come, we settle in and meet Dr. Stephen Strange: an arrogant, ambitious, and flashy neurosurgeon who due to an accident must go on a journey of discovery. Initially hoping to find a way to heal his all-important hands, he ends up mixed up...
I, Daniel Blake review: bitter benefits drama

I, Daniel Blake review: bitter benefits drama

I, Daniel Blake makes its intentions blindingly clear from its opening salvo: a fiery criticism of successive UK governments’ efforts to dismantle the country’s benefits system. The film opens on black as the credits roll, accompanied by the sound of the titular Daniel Blake (Dave Johns) undergoing an assessment for Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)....
Free Fire review: inventive fun

Free Fire review: inventive fun

Ben Wheatley has kept mostly to high concept fare in his films to date, but with BFI London Film Festival closer Free Fire he’s keeping things simple: 12 men (and woman), a lot of guns, a lot of money, and a single warehouse. The setting is Boston, 1978. The IRA (represented here by Cillian Murphy...
Snowden review: a little too conventional

Snowden review: a little too conventional

You don’t have to be a film buff to guess what Snowden, the latest film from Oliver Stone, is about. Edward Snowden, IT consultant and former employee of the CIA and NSA, made headlines all over the world when he leaked thousands of classified documents to the press, exposing the illegal practices adopted by the...
Your Name review: deserves huge admiration

Your Name review: deserves huge admiration

Your Name, Japanese director Makoto Shinkai’s latest animated feature, bubbles over with far more mirth than most of Studio Ghibli’s collection but nonetheless, comparisons have been drawn between both, as well as between him and the now retired Hayao Miyazaki. Frustratingly it’s impossible not to enter this film with every Ghibli movie swimming around in...
It's Only the End of the World review: touching and explosive

It’s Only the End of the World review: touching and explosive

All families are dysfunctional. But this is a Xavier Dolan family – and therefore about as dysfunctional as they get. It’s Only the End of the World is 27-year-old Dolan’s sixth feature, and, if he proved his maturity with Mommy, his most recent film shows he is definitely here for the long haul. Here we...
Our Exclusive Interview With Actor Arinzé Kene

Our Exclusive Interview With Actor Arinzé Kene

If you haven’t already heard of playwright and actor Arinzé Kene, you’ll definitely know his name by the end of the year. He is currently playing the role of soul singer, Sam Cooke in Donmar Warehouses’ production of One Night in Miami; a fictional account of a real night in history, this four hander tells the story of the...
The Autopsy of Jane Doe review: masterful horror

The Autopsy of Jane Doe review: masterful horror

After shocking us with the unmissable, one-of-a-kind Troll Hunter, Norwegian director André Øvredal has become a talent you want to keep a close eye on. His new feature The Autopsy of Jane Doe is debuting at the London Film Festival as the Cult gala, and rewards that close attention. While the synopsis warns that this is a...
La La Land review: sure to be a classic

La La Land review: sure to be a classic

It’s satisfying just to see Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling tap dance whilst simultaneously looking for their cars on the gargantuan Hollywood Hills really, but this is far from the highlight of Damien Chazelle’s latest film. The success of his last, Whiplash, placed considerable and not unwarranted expectation on La La Land. Spectacular in style and...



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