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New Music: Venus Demilo

May 29, 2016

MusicReview | by Sophia Miles


Venus Demilo are fairly new to the music scene, with a daunting legacy behind their city of origin. Contemporary Liverpool quartets will always have to contend with the Beatles sized silhouette perennially lingering over the city, although such a catalyst for musical inspiration has seen a steady stream of heirs to the throne as a section of the North West which breeds high quality musicianship as part of an unrelenting melting pot of innovation.

venus demilo

Venus Demilo was the brainchild of Tom Anderson (vocals/guitar) back in 2014, where he was joined by Reuben Hobson (lead guitar), Christopher Connor (bass) and Ryan Williams (drums). Discerning fans of thought-provoking indie-pop that takes the shape of material similar to The Maccabees, Foals and Bombay Bicycle Club will find comfort in the band’s penchant for call-back harmonies, hypnotic rhythms and soaring choruses. New single Sinking Ships which was released in mid-April is drenched in an ethereal atmosphere, complete with wistful beachside metaphors of ever changing tides as part of a resonating tale of youthful frustration in trying to achieve what is expected, all the while maintaining a sense of living in the moment.

The Josh Tilley directed music video, which can be viewed below, represents an immaculate depiction of such weariness, with escapist coastal imagery featuring the protagonist attempting to literally bury his past in the sand. The visual overlays a swirling soundtrack featuring rattling tremolo guitar backing Anderson’s anguished chorus vocal cries of, “I’m just trying to hold on, trying not to slip” not dissimilar in range to Bastille’s Dan Smith.

 

Even this brief introduction is enough to understand the level of continued support for the band from BBC Radio Merseyside and Gigslutz amongst many others, alongside recent supporting dates with the likes of The Pigeon Detectives, Beach Baby and Johnny Foreigner, Venus Demilo are already in defiant ascendance.

 

Words by Jamie Boyd