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Night At The Museum: Secret Of The Tomb – Review

December 21, 2014

Film + Entertainment | by James Joseph


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Who knew YouTube could be so handy in saving one’s life from a group of ferocious stone lions? Not only is Shawn Levy’s third and final film in the Night at the Museum series very useful in this respect, it surpassed my admittedly low expectations as it’s actually rather good.

Five years after the second and eight after the first, Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb finds Larry Daley (Ben Stiller) still working at the Museum of Natural History and continuing to have great fun with the various collections that come to life through the magic of an ancient tablet. The late Robin Williams reprises his role as proud former president Teddy Roosevelt as does Owen Wilson as Jedediah, Steve Coogan as Octavius and Ricky Gervais’s Dr McPhee. Ben Kingsley, Pitch Perfect‘s Rebel Wilson and Downton Abbey‘s Dan Stevens also join the cast. This time around the action also journeys over to London and specifically, the quite glorious British Museum and with it, you guessed, the magic.

Stiller once again brings a lovely amount of sympathy and appropriate heroism to Larry, dispensing what he hopes is fatherly wisdom on teenage son, Nick (Skyler Gisondo). A lot of the action centres on Stevens’s Sir Lancelot and he brings much charm and humour to the role; one it seems he has a lot of fun with. Wilson is much the same as she is in everything else we’ve seen her in: flipping mental. I found myself wondering if her lines were actually scripted; bumbling away in the hope of something remotely sensical coming out of her mouth. I like her but wouldn’t mind one bit if she perhaps didn’t insist on always talking absolute jibbabba.

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An unexpected yet brilliant cameo by Hugh Jackman as himself, on stage at the London Palladium revs up the starry cast but certainly doesn’t give us any hope of exiting such a building safely (where are the ushers?!)

Bonkers aside, this is a lovely conclusion to the not altogether perfect trilogy. If you’re a fan of the series, the cast or even museums and archaeology, there’s much to fall (back) in love with. There’s a heady mix of action, good humour and heart and I dare anyone not to boogie in their seat during the closing moments. Really worth a look.

Night At The Museum: Secret Of The Tomb
is out in UK cinemas from December 19th

Samuel Sims